Who is eligible for a booster and additional dose of the COVID-19 vaccine?

Pfizer

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have authorized a booster of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for all individuals 5 years of age and older, five months after the last dose in the initial series. In addition, individuals ages 50 and older may choose to receive a second booster four months after the first booster.

Moderna

The FDA and CDC have also authorized a booster of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine for all individuals 18 years of age and older, five months after the last dose in the initial series. Please note that the Moderna booster is a half dose. In addition, individuals ages 50 and older may choose to receive a second booster four months after the first booster.

Johnson & Johnson

The CDC recommends that individuals who received a J&J vaccine now receive a booster of an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) two months after their initial dose. In addition, a second booster of an mRNA vaccine may be administered four months after the first booster.

Moderately and severely immunocompromised individuals:

  • Immunocompromised individuals who received Moderna and Pfizer should receive a third dose as part of the primary series 28 days later and then a booster three months later. Immunocompromised individuals ages 12 and older may choose to receive a second booster four months after the first booster for a total of five shots.
  • The CDC is now recommending that immunocompromised individuals who received the J&J vaccine should get an additional shot of either Pfizer or Moderna as part of the primary series before getting a booster. As such, immunocompromised individuals who received J&J as their initial dose should now receive a second dose of an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) as part of the primary series 28 days later and then a booster of an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) two months later. Immunocompromised individuals ages 12 and older may choose to receive a second mRNA booster four months after the first booster for a total of four shots.
  • Immunocompromised individuals ages 5-11 should get a booster three months after the last dose of the initial series for a total of four shots.

Moderate or severely immunocompromised is defined as the following:

  • Active treatment for solid tumor and hematologic malignancies
  • Receipt of solid-organ transplant and taking immunosuppressive therapy
  • Receipt of CAR-T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (within 2 years of transplantation or taking immunosuppression therapy)
  • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (e.g., DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
  • Advanced or untreated HIV infection
  • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids (i.e., ≥20mg prednisone or equivalent per day), alkylating agents, antimetabolites, transplant-related immunosuppressive drugs, cancer chemotherapeutic agents classified as severely immunosuppressive, tumor-necrosis (“TNF”) blockers, and other biologic agents that are immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory
  • Any other moderately to severely immunocompromising condition deemed as such by the treating provider

Of important note: The FDA and CDC also confirmed that eligible individuals can receive a different COVID-19 vaccine as a booster from the one they initially received.

We continue to monitor for new developments and will provide updates if a booster is recommended for additional populations.

More information on how eligible individuals can receive their COVID-19 vaccine booster can be found here.

Preguntas frecuentes

Booster and third dose eligibility and facts

  • Who is eligible for a booster?

    Pfizer

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have authorized a booster of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for all individuals 5 years of age and older, five months after the last dose of the initial series. In addition, individuals age 50 and older may choose to receive a second booster four months after the first booster.

    Moderna

    The FDA and CDC have also authorized a booster of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine for all individuals 18 years of age and older, five months after the last dose of the initial series. Please note that the Moderna booster is a half dose. In addition, individuals age 50 and older may choose to receive a second booster four months after the first booster.

    Johnson & Johnson

    The CDC recommends that individuals who received a J&J vaccine now receive a booster of an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) two months after their initial dose.

    Moderately and severely immunocompromised individuals:

    • Immunocompromised individuals who received Moderna and Pfizer should receive a third dose as part of the primary series 28 days later and then a booster three months later. Immunocompromised individuals ages 12 and older may choose to receive a second booster four months after the first booster for a total of five shots.
    • The CDC is now recommending that immunocompromised individuals who received the J&J vaccine should get an additional shot of either Pfizer or Moderna as part of the primary series before getting a booster. As such, immunocompromised individuals who received J&J as their initial dose should now receive a second dose of an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) as part of the primary series 28 days later and then a booster of an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) two months later. Immunocompromised individuals ages 12 and older may choose to receive a second mRNA booster four months after the first booster for a total of four shots.
    • Immunocompromised individuals ages 5-11 should get a booster three months after the last dose of the initial series for a total of four shots.

    Moderate or severely immunocompromised is defined as the following:

    • Active treatment for solid tumor and hematologic malignancies
    • Receipt of solid-organ transplant and taking immunosuppressive therapy
    • Receipt of CAR-T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell transplant (within 2 years of transplantation or taking immunosuppression therapy)
    • Moderate or severe primary immunodeficiency (e.g., DiGeorge syndrome, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome)
    • Advanced or untreated HIV infection
    • Active treatment with high-dose corticosteroids (i.e., ≥20mg prednisone or equivalent per day), alkylating agents, antimetabolites, transplant-related immunosuppressive drugs, cancer chemotherapeutic agents classified as severely immunosuppressive, tumor-necrosis (“TNF”) blockers, and other biologic agents that are immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory
    • Any other moderately to severely immunocompromising condition deemed as such by the treating provider

    Of important note: The FDA and CDC also confirmed that eligible individuals can receive a different COVID-19 vaccine as a booster from the one they initially received.

    We continue to monitor for new developments and will provide updates if a booster is recommended for additional populations.

    More information on how eligible individuals can receive their COVID-19 vaccine booster can be found here.

  • Who is eligible for a second booster?
    • Individuals ages 12 years and older who are moderately or severely immunocompromised may choose to receive a second booster dose using an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine at least 4 months after the first booster dose
    • Adults ages 50 years and older who are not moderately or severely immunocompromised may choose to receive a second booster dose using an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine at least 4 months after the first booster dose
    • Individuals ages 18–49 years who are not moderately or severely immunocompromised and who received Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine may receive a second booster dose using an mRNA COVID-19 vaccine at least 4 months after the first Janssen booster dose
  • I am immunocompromised. How many shots do I need to receive?

    For those who are immunocompromised, please note the following:

    • Immunocompromised individuals who received Moderna and Pfizer should receive a third dose as part of the primary series 28 days later and then a booster three months later. Immunocompromised individuals ages 12 and older may choose to receive a second booster four months after the first booster for a total of five shots.
    • The CDC is now recommending that immunocompromised individuals who received the J&J vaccine should get an additional shot of either Pfizer or Moderna as part of the primary series before getting a booster. As such, immunocompromised individuals who received J&J as their initial dose should now receive a second dose of an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) as part of the primary series 28 days later and then a booster of an mRNA vaccine (Pfizer or Moderna) two months later. Immunocompromised individuals ages 12 and older may choose to receive a second mRNA booster four months after the first booster for a total of four shots.
    • Immunocompromised individuals ages 5-11 should get a booster three months after the last dose of the initial series for a total of four shots.
  • Are pregnant women eligible for the Pfizer booster?

    Yes, pregnant women are eligible for the booster. Pregnant women should receive a booster vaccination when its time to get one.

  • Why is a booster necessary?

    According to the CDC, although COVID-19 vaccination for older adults remains effective in preventing severe disease, recent data suggest vaccination is less effective at preventing infection or milder illness with symptoms over time. Clinical trial data show a booster shot may result in increased effectiveness compared to primary vaccination.

  • Does the booster have to be from the same manufacturer as the first two I received?

    The FDA and CDC recently updated their guidance and confirmed that eligible individuals can receive a different COVID-19 vaccine as a booster from the one they initially received.

  • Are there any new side effects associated with receiving a booster?

    No. There have been no new side effects reported in patients who received a booster of the vaccine.

  • Should I get an antibody test before getting the booster?

    No. It is not necessary to get an antibody test before getting a booster.

  • Do you have to get the booster to be considered fully vaccinated?

    No, however, the CDC is urging everyone to stay up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines. This includes immunocompromised people who are eligible for additional doses and those who are eligible for a booster.

  • If I received the monovalent booster(s), do I need to get the new bivalent booster?

    Yes, for those who are 12 years of age and older, it is recommended that you receive the new bivalent booster at least 2 months after you have completed the primary series or if you received the original monovalent booster. The Pfizer bivalent booster is authorized for those 12 years of age and older, and the Moderna bivalent booster is authorized for those 18 years of age and older.

  • What is a bivalent booster?

    The new U.S. boosters are combination, or “bivalent,” shots. They contain half that original vaccine recipe and half protection against the newest omicron versions, called BA.4 and BA.5, that are considered the most contagious yet. The combination aims to increase cross-protection against multiple variants.


  • I am immunocompromised or over the age of 50. Do I need two bivalent boosters?

    No, it is recommended that you receive only one bivalent booster at this time, at least 2 months after you have completed the primary series or if you received the original monovalent booster.


  • What booster is authorized for those 11 years old and younger?

    The monovalent booster (the original booster) is currently authorized for those 11 years old and younger. At this time, the new bivalent booster is only authorized for those 12 and older.


Getting a booster at Baylor Scott & White

  • How do I get my vaccine booster through Baylor Scott & White?

    Those eligible for a booster can self-schedule on MyBSWHealth.com and the app, or call the vaccine line (1.844.BSW.VACC) to schedule an appointment.

    Appointments are preferred. Walk-in availability is extremely limited.

  • What if I got my initial vaccination(s) at a non-Baylor Scott & White location? Can I get my booster through Baylor Scott & White?

    Yes. As long as you meet the eligibility criteria, we can offer you a vaccination.

  • What do I need to bring with me to get my booster?

    If you have your CDC vaccination card from your first two doses or the single-shot J&J vaccine, please bring that with you.

  • I can’t find my CDC vaccination card. Can I still get my booster?

    Yes. If you cannot find your vaccination card, we will provide you with a new one with the date of the booster. You can request a copy of your immunization record from the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) site.

    If you received your COVID-19 vaccine at a Baylor Scott & White facility, you can also access and print your immunization record, including the lot number, through MyBSWHealth.com using these instructions.

  • I don't meet the listed criteria. Will Baylor Scott & White still give me a booster?

    Please speak with your doctor to see whether your specific condition or medication you may be taking qualifies you for recommending the booster.

  • Why can’t I just go to my Baylor Scott & White doctor’s office for my booster?

    Baylor Scott & White only has vaccine supply allocated to certain locations conveniently located throughout our service areas. Please click here to view our available locations and scheduling options. Please note that walk-in availability at our sites is extremely limited and appointments are preferred.

    If you do receive your booster outside of BSW, please be sure to send a picture of your CDC card to your BSW provider through the MyBSWHealth messaging portal.